Book review: Convenience Store Woman

"Convenience Store Woman, by Sayaka Murata, is a love letter. It is not romantic love, or love between relatives: it is a letter to that bittersweet love between a misfit and those rare places where one feels at home; both consoled and trapped."
Por Paola Saucedo
Jul 20, 2022

Convenience Store Woman, by Sayaka Murata, is a love letter.  It is not romantic love, or love between relatives: it is a letter to that bittersweet love between a misfit and those rare places where one feels at home;  both consoled and trapped.

 36-year-old Keiko Furukura has never fully understood people, and she carefully studies their fascinating behaviors in order to fit in.

With a protagonist as confusing as she is confused, Sayaka Murata manages to observe society from both the outside and the inside.  Even for those who do not fit in, it is impossible to separate completely.

This short novel is perfect to read on a trip or while waiting for something.  With each page, it is easy to feel that we are accompanying Keiko from the fringes of society as she seeks her place in the world and learns to live on the fringes.


Paola Saucedo

Paola Saucedo

Politics & Democracy writer from The Bookish Man.
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