Book review: One hundred years of solitude

"One Hundred Years of Solitude is a work by the Colombian writer Gabriel García Márquez, it is one of the most converted and read books in Spanish, in 1999 the newspaper Le Monde, included it in the 33rd position of its list 'the 100 books of the century'."
Por Mariana Barrera
Jul 6, 2022

One Hundred Years of Solitude is a work by the Colombian writer Gabriel García Márquez, it is one of the most converted and read books in Spanish, in 1999 the newspaper Le Monde, included it in the 33rd position of its list “the 100 books of the century”.

The story focuses on the Buendía family. For six generations, from José Arcadio Buendía and his wife Úrsula, belonging to one of the founding families of the town where the plot takes place-Macondo- until the sixth, Aureliano Babilonia. It is framed in the beginning of the 20th century and you can see the war between liberals and conservatives in which Colonel Aureliano Buendía, belonging to the generation, is involved. As well as the second arrival of the Americans in Macondo who installed a banana plantation .



It belongs to the genre of magical realism and therefore unreal elements appear

Such as Úrsula’s fear of having a son with a pig’s tail since she and her husband are cousins, or the deluge in which Macondo has been submerged for years. At the beginning of the novel, the presence of the gypsies who bring new inventions to the town is of great importance. This awakens in José Arcadio Buendía the desire for alchemy that ends up driving him to madness. Of all the gypsies, Melquíades stands out, ending up living with the family until his death. Leaving behind some manuscripts, that can only be deciphered when a hundred years have passed. Loneliness is very present throughout the work, since none of the members of the family seem to find true love, as is reflected at the end of it

“… because the lineages condemned to one hundred years of solitude do not have a second chance on the Earth”

It seems to me a very good work with a very interesting plot, narrated in a simple way that makes it easy to read despite not having dialogues. However, sometimes it can be a bit confusing if you don’t keep a good count of the names of the characters, since these are usually repeated for all the members of the family. I would recommend it to anyone who likes to read, in the same way that I would recommend other works by this author. For example Chronicle of a Death Foretold, a lighter book that, like this one, brings you closer to the customs and life of Latin American societies.

Mariana Barrera

Mariana Barrera

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