Nanotechnology in medicine

"In recent decades nanotechnology has been used to manufacture, characterize and modify the functional properties of nanoparticles for medical diagnosis and biomedical applications."
Por Clarisa Benavides
Jul 26, 2022

A large-scale study by researchers at MIT and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard may help overcome some of the obstacles to nanoparticle-based drug development.

As established in the book Nanomedicine and drug delivery (2014), in recent decades nanotechnology has been used to manufacture, characterize and modify the functional properties of nanoparticles for medical diagnosis and biomedical applications. One of the applications of nanomaterials is the possibility of administering drugs selectively and in specific places, eliminating a tumor without any collateral damage.

Currently, the FDA has only approved certain nanoparticle-based cancer drugs.

These represent a way to attack tumors with large doses of drugs, while avoiding the harmful side effects of chemotherapy.

The team’s analysis was based on interactions between 35 different types of nanoparticles and nearly 500 types of cancer cells, revealing thousands of biological traits that influence whether these cells take up different types of nanoparticles.



The results could be useful for better tailoring drug delivery particles to specific types of cancer, or in designing new particles with biological characteristics of specific types of cancer cells.

Paula Hammond, a professor at the MIT Institute, commented :

“We’re excited about our findings because it’s really just the beginning: we can use this approach to determine which types of nanoparticles are best at targeting certain cell types, from cancer to immune cells.” and other cell types from healthy and diseased organs. We’re learning how surface chemistry and other material properties play a role in orientation.”

Hammond’s lab has shown that different types of cancer cells tend to respond differently to the same nanoparticles. In the study, the researchers hypothesized that biological differences between the cells might be driving the variation in their responses.

For their analysis, the researchers used 488 cancer cell lines from 22 different tissues.

“Hopefully it will inspire others to start looking at their nanoparticle systems in a similar way”

Boehnke.

References:

Trafton, A. (2022). How different cancer cells respond to drug-delivering nanoparticles. Recuperado de https://www.lifescience.net/news/4671/how-different-cancer-cells-respond-to-drug-deliver/

Zeeshan. (2014) https://www.researchgate.net/publication/262980985_Nanomedicine_and_drug_delivery_A_mini_review

Clarisa Benavides

Clarisa Benavides

Science & Technology writer in The Bookish Man.
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